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Spring Fever – Fun Ways to Include Your Pet in Your Wedding Planning

Spring has sprung, and love is in the air.  Most of us have that special pet in our lives, but some of us are lucky enough to have a special someone else in our lives.  Perhaps you both got your pet together, and now you are ready to take that next step with regards to your future.  Don’t let your pet miss out on being a part of your forever and ever.


The Proposal


Proposal image referenced from Huffingtonpost.com, and can be found here.

There are honestly so many ideas that you could come up with to include your pet with your proposal.   Get creative and jot some ideas down, and see what works best for you.  A few suggestions would be to get a name tag engraved with “Will You Marry Me” or, teach your pet to balance a ring on their head. The fact of the matter is, you know your pet best.  Have fun with it, and them!









Engagement Photos, Save the Dates, and Invitations

Resourced from theknot.com

Engagement photo referenced from theknot.com, and can be found here.


I love the idea of pets being in engagement photo’s, just remember that pets can be unpredictable.  In the event that you hire a photographer, be sure to give them a heads up so that they are also prepared.  It probably wouldn’t hurt to bring some extra treats with you the day of the photoshoot.  Invitations are another great way to include your pet.  Sites such as Shutterfly make creating your own invitations and save the dates a breeze!





Resourced from Brides.com

Wedding image referenced from Huffingtonpost.com, and can be found here.

There is nothing like man’s best friend being the best man, flower girl, ring bearer, or maid of honor! Your pet can have any role at your wedding.  Be sure to check with the venue that they are pet friendly.  If you plan on including your pet, do your homework and check out sites such as BringFido.com for a list of pet friendly attractions.  Receptions can become pretty hectic, and maybe even scary for some pets.  Do not assume that your drunk uncle is keeping an eye out on your pet, hire a pet sitter!









The Reception

Resourced from Topweddingsites.com

Image referenced from Topweddingsites.com, and can be found here.

The ceremony is over, and now your pet sitter is keeping an eye on your furbaby. Time to get the party started!  Do not feel bad if your pet can’t be a physical part of the festivities. Have your guests find their seat at a table marked with your pets picture!  There are a lot of cute ways you can include your pet in your decor, such as name place cards, centerpieces, cake toppers, table favors, and so much more!  We understand that some pets may have crossed over the rainbow bridge, but they are forever in your hearts.  Include your beloved pet with a beautiful pet memorial, guest book, or let your guests know that money from the dollar dance will be donated to your favorite rescue in memory of your pet.   It’s your day, make it special.






Have you included your pet in your wedding?  Please share how in the comments below!  We would love to see pictures too.  Please feel free to post your pictures to our Facebook page!









Feathered Sanctuary Bird Rescue – The Birdman Cometh

If you have been to That Fish Place – That Pet Place within the last year, you may have noticed all of the different rescues that we have had come into showcase their organization. When we think of rescues, we typically think of cats and dogs, but we often forget about the other animals that are in need of loving homes as well. Like clockwork, our favorite bird man Alan Sipe has brought his own birds in on Saturday’s from 10am-2pm to help represent the Feathered Sanctuary out of Kirkwood. His own expertise, and the hands on experience that some folks have been lucky enough to experience help to establish what it takes to adopt a rescued bird. January is Adopt a Rescued Bird Month, and what better way to celebrate than to interview the birdman himself.


What does Feathered Sanctuary cover for adopting or fostering?
A certificate is given to adopters good for a free wellness check with Dr. Hall at VCA Bridgeport.  Typically a cage comes with the bird. If one is not available, the adoption fee would be a lesser dollar amount.  Range is from $5.00 to $600.00 and anywhere in between.  Since we have a facility, we do not typically foster birds. On rare occasions we do foster special needs birds and food is provided by the rescue.

Is there a foster period? If there is difficulty getting a newly adopted bird settled into a new home we will work with that person.

How can I meet some of the adoptable birds? Stop in at our facility located at 1674 Kirkwood Pike in Kirkwood, PAQ, located just south of Quarryville.

Do you offer educational resources and/or classes? From time to time we do offer Birdie 101 11156416_919226121434121_4985431829583447590_nintroduction classes. Also, the knowledgeable staff at the rescue will answer questions.

What is a bird’s average life span? Canaries about 10-15 years, Cockatiels 15-30 years, Amazons 50-70 years and Macaws 50-80 years.

Can birds be left alone if I work or go to school? Yes….they do not require 24/7 attention. A few hours of interaction daily is plenty.

What does a bird cost on average a year? Food and toys could run anywhere between $150 a year for a small bird to $500 a year for a large Macaw!



What are some of the things that the rescue does daily? Volunteers clean cages & grates, vacuum floors, feed & water birds as well as get birds out to socialize.

How would I go about volunteering for Feathered Sanctuary?  Stop by the rescue and fill out an application form for volunteering. Must be 16 or older to volunteer alone, but if younger you may volunteer accompanied by a responsible adult!

Are there any other ways that someone can help the Feathered Sanctuary?  Monetary donations are always accepted, supplies such as large garbage bags, vacuum bags, paper towels, printer paper, printer ink and much more.

Where do these rescue birds come from? Birds may outlive their owners, life changes: divorce, newborn, residency move, career change, as well as neglect and/or abuse.

What is one of your happiest memories from volunteering at the rescue? An Umbrella Cockatoo named Angel came in to our rescue with a kicked in cage door and the owners saying the bird was aggressive and noisy. I discovered through interaction with the bird that it was docile and lovable. The poor scared baby was just misunderstood!


Thank you Alan for taking the time to answer all of our questions. If you would like to know more, feel free to reach out, and don’t forget to visit Alan at our store!

No Monkey Business – Caring for a Pet Monkey

Marcel from FriendsIf you’re as old as I am, you’ll probably remember that Ross from the TV show Friends had a capuchin monkey named Marcel early in the show’s infancy. Despite what the few episodes he appeared in showed, caring for a pet monkey is no simple task!

If you’re considering the purchase of a pet monkey, the first thing you’ll want to do is check on your state and city/county laws on the possession of non-human primates. There are 19 states (including New York and Pennsylvania) that outlaw the possession of monkeys. There are many other states that have partial bans or other requirements for the possession of monkeys as pets. Check out Pet Monkey Info for more information on the laws in your state.

Please welcome Jamal, our guest poster for the rest of this basic care guide on pet monkeys, as pet monkeys are beyond the scope of the pets the experts at That Pet Place. No matter what kind of pet you decide on, you should do a lot of research and talk with other pet owners in your area for advice before making any decision; doubly so for any exotic, uncommon wild creature in the U.S.


SQUIRREL MONKEYIt should be noted, that most of you are not cut out to be monkey owners. Now this is not slander on your ability as people, it is merely an observation that the average person does not have the time nor the commitment that is required to properly care for a monkey. A comparable example to a pet monkey is caring for a toddler an entire lifetime.

To the brave few who feel they are up to the task, I salute you and encourage that you read on.


This short guide is a great start to obtaining the information that you would need to begin caring for your first pet monkey, but far from complete. You must do extensive research, scouring the internet and books, for all information you can gather. To take this one step further try reaching out to an actual monkey owner to see what methods they use which you feel will be transferable to your monkey. Do the majority of your research before obtaining your monkey as this could be as this could be the decision maker into whether or not you are up to caring for a monkey. Make sure to research the different breeds of monkeys before getting much farther into the process.
Read More »

Carbon Monoxide and Pets

white dog sleepingDo you ever consider the dangers of carbon monoxide to pets? One of our Facebook fans recently shared with us a tragic story of 12 pet birds lost to carbon monoxide poisoning. The heartbreaking tale also involved the family dog who, after some time has made a full recovery. This blog post is intended to raise awareness of the dangers of Carbon Monoxide poisoning not just for people, but for the pets we keep as well. Most cases of carbon monoxide toxicity in pets occur, sadly, due to human error, and the results can be devastating.  A dog left in an enclosed garage with a running automobile, for example, can be exposed to toxic levels of carbon monoxide in about ten minutes. But animals may also exposed to toxic levels of carbon monoxide when they are trapped in a building that is on fire, or when a slow leak from a heating system amongst other causes. It’s important to make yourself familiar with easy ways to prevent exposure, as well as a course of action should evacuation or medical attention be necessary.

What is Carbon Monoxide?

Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless, non-irritating gas produced by the incomplete combustion of carbon fuels. It is potentially toxic and may even cause death. Carbon monoxide may be produced by unventilated kerosene or propane heaters, gasoline engines, automobile exhaust, or fumes from carbon-based fuel heating systems. When inhaled, Carbon Monoxide gas is readily absorbed into the bloodstream, combining with hemoglobin and rapidly reducing oxygen delivery to the body,leading to decreased oxygen to the brain and heart. Prolonged exposure to carbon monoxide leads to hypoxemia (critically low blood oxygen levels) and eventually death.

What are the signs and symptoms of Carbon Monoxide poisoning?

Depending upon the concentration and duration of exposure of carbon monoxide, the symptoms may manifest quickly, or gradually over a period of prolonged exposure. Some pets, such as birds, are more sensitive to Carbon Monoxide levels and relatively small exposure may prove detrimental. Acute behavioral and physical symptoms include:

•Labored breathing
•Erratic movements

Pregnant animals, especially those in late gestation, may abort their babies pre term. Examination of your pet’s skin and mucous membranes such as nostrils, ears, genitals may show bright red coloration, though this symptom may not be apparent on most pets.

Consistant exposure to lower levels of carbon monoxide include flu like symptoms like nausea, vomiting, aches, weakness and loss of stamina. Blood acidosis is also a side effect.

Diagnosis and Treatment

Carbon monoxide detectorCarbon monoxide is life-threatening and treatment will require immediate veterinary attention. If you know or suspect that your pet is suffering from carbon monoxide toxicity, the first step is to move your pets away from the source of the carbon monoxide to a place where they can breathe fresh air. As soon as possible, transport them to the vet for oxygen therapy and fluids. The oxygen will remove the carbon monoxide from the blood, bringing your pet’s oxygen levels back to normal. Your vet will also collect blood samples for a complete blood count and biochemistry, as establishing the levels of carbon monoxide, carboxyhemoglobin and acids in the blood will dictate the initial treatment plan and continued treatment. Urinalysis and other applicable body fluid tests may also be performed. In some cases, your veterinarian may perform an electrocardiogram (ECG) to determine if your pet’s heart function has also been affected.

Your vet will instruct you on extended care. Generally, while your pet is recovering from the carbon monoxide poisoning, activity should be limited for several weeks following the exposure. Shorter walks, limited play and exercise, and a little extra TLC will be required until your pet is fully recovered. Observe your pet closely during recovery for residual signs of nervous system issues, and if you see any anomalies, contact your vet as soon as possible.


Obviously, the best course of action is to prevent your pets and the rest of your family from exposure of any detrimental levels of carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide detectors are the first line of defense against this elusive killer, and should be installed in various areas of your home. Minimize or prevent exposure to carbon monoxide by ensuring that your heating system, water heater and any other gas, oil, or coal burning appliances are serviced annually by a qualified technician. Don’t use generators, charcoal grills or other gasoline or charcoal-burning devices inside your home, basement, or garage or near a window where gasses could accumulate in an enclosed area.
And don’t run a vehicle inside a garage attached, even if you leave the door open, and especially if the garage is attached to your house. Provide adequate ventilation for any fuel powered device and be sure to know what to do should an unfortunate exposure to carbon monoxide should occur.

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning can occur any time of year and is often due to human error. Protect you and your family, including four-footed members through prevention and close attention to potential sources.

White dog sleeping image referenced from wikipedia and originally posted by Eli Duke

Skunks as Pets

Friendly SkunkThough most people try to avoid encounters with skunks, there are those who actually seek out these black and white mayhem-makers as companion pets, comparing them in personality to cats, dogs, and ferrets. Skunks are rising in popularity due to their intelligence, carefree personalities, and (believe it or not) cleanliness. Pennsylvania and most other states require a permit to keep a captive skunk as a pet. Before deciding to bring a skunk into your family, do your research and be sure you can handle their requirements. Read More »

Virginia and Short-Tailed Opossums as Pets, with Notes on Heidi, a Cross-Eyed Star

OpossumA Virginia or North American Opossum, Didelphis virginiana, purchased from a fur farm for $5.00, was my first “large” wild animal pet.  I’ve since raised many orphaned youngsters, several of which became tame enough to use in educational programs.  So I’ve always had an affinity for North America’s only marsupial…but my enthusiasm is not shared by many.  I was, therefore, greatly surprised by the recent fame of a cross-eyed Opossum named Heidi, who resides in Germany’s Leipzig Zoo.

The First Opossum “Star”

Heidi’s journey to the zoo is interesting in and of itself – orphaned in North Carolina, she was reared at a nature center and eventually found her way to a zoo in Denmark, and from there to Germany.  But the key to her popularity is the appealing look of a face dominated by “unique eyes”.  Read More »

The Bedding Dilemma – Choosing the Right Bedding for Your Small Pet

Hamster in shavingsSeasoned small animal owners tend to bicker over the smallest of details when it comes to the care of their pet. From food to free time, no one seems to agree on just one thing. When it comes to bedding though, there seems to be an all out war over which is best. As a small pet owner, I’ve used just about every variety of bedding on the market, and even I get confused sometimes. One will claim to have the best odor control, but it’s really dusty. Another will be softer and cuddlier for your pet sleep in, but it smells bad even when it’s clean. There is no perfect small animal bedding…but, there is probably be one that is best for your particular situation. There are pros and cons to all the small animal bedding types available. Here’s my break down on what to expect from the most popular types available. Read More »

Ferret Owners Beware – a Fatal Disease Common in Unmated Females

Female Domestic Ferrets that are not allowed to breed often contract a life-threatening disease known as Estrus-Associated Aplastic Anemia.  Spaying your Ferret before she enters her first estrus cycle (the period during which she can become pregnant, also known as “heat”) is the best defense against this and other reproductive disorders.

A Unique Breeding Strategy

Ferrets and other members of the family Mustelidae (weasels, mink, otters and related species) have evolved a unique reproductive strategy known as induced ovulation.  Unlike most mammals, female Ferrets do not ovulate (release eggs so that they may be fertilized) until the act of mating has occurred.  Read More »

Join A Cause and Help Animals

Poultry Factory FarmAnimal lovers know that animal welfare is one of the most important issues in the world.  I thought I’d blog a little on several organizations that work against animal abuse and mistreatment. You can help the animals in many small ways, whether by giving a little money, choosing not to wear fur, becoming a vegetarian, signing a petition, adopting a pet from a shelter, or even just spreading the word. Without animals, our world would be a very sad place. Please click on at least one of the following links and get involved today! Read More »

Staying Updated on Laws Affecting Pet Ownership and Animal Welfare

Dog in a ShelterRecent concerns over animal hoarding, introduced species and animal attacks have resulted in a confusing maze of new laws.  Many are legitimate attempts to address serious problems, while others seem over-reactions based on poor research.  I’m an attorney as well as a biologist, and yet even with this background I find it difficult to keep up with all the changes.  However, I’ve found several organizations that track pending legislation and provide links to actions that can be taken…I hope the following helpful information is useful. Read More »

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