Home | Cats (page 3)

Category Archives: Cats

Feed Subscription

Holiday Gift Guide – Top 10 Gifts for Your Cats

Cat ShelvesChristmas is just around the corner and it just wouldn’t be complete without some gifts under the tree for your favorite feline(s)!  There are some great gifts for your cats to add to the list this year…read on to make this holiday a success for your precious pet with these great holiday suggestions!

1. Cat/Cloud Shelves

Everyone who shares a home with a cat knows they love to climb and explore areas that provide the best view of the room. Whether you have limited space or not, a cumbersome cat tree may not be an option. Enter the new line of cat shelves available at thatpetplace.com. These innovative and attractive wall mount shelves are functional wall decor, so they’re as much a gift to you as they are for your kitties. Install the shelves on any wall to create open and secure resting and perching spots for your pets. The shelves are sleek and stylish, and a variety of colors allows you to choose the unit that best fits your existing decor. Each shelf features a wide, cushioned base to accommodate cat weight up to 50 lb. Read More »

Holiday Tips and Suggestions for Pet Owners

Cat in Christmas TreeI don’t know about you, but two of the things I’m most thankful for everyday are my two faithful pups! They provide me with joy, companionship and unconditional love that I don’t know how I could survive without. They go everywhere with me and, of course, I tend to share everything with them, so the Holidays are a fun and busy time for all of us. Here are a few things to keep in mind this holiday season to be sure you can keep your pets involved, but also safe and happy through the most hectic time of the year!

 

Travel

As I mentioned before, my pets pretty much go everywhere with me. I’m fortunate to come from a pet-loving family and my dogs are welcome at family gatherings where they can visit their “cousins” and have rowdy time just like the kids in the clan. They are seasoned travelers, but we still leave the house prepared with leashes, water and any other necessities that may find use on long road trips and for pit stops if your travel is extended. The rest of this section is common sense. If you aren’t able or choose Christmas Dognot to bring your pet along to holiday gatherings make sure they’re left with plenty of fresh water and maybe a special chewy or treat to keep them occupied for the day. If you’re going away for longer than a day be sure to either make arrangements to have your pet boarded at a kennel or cared for by a trusted friend or service, either from your home or in their space. Read More »

Why Does My Cat Do That? – Common Questions on Kitty Behavior

Happy CatYou know your pets better than anyone, but even though you love them no matter what, their adorable and often mystifying behaviors may sometimes make you ask “why do you do that”?  Here are some simple answers to common questions on cat behaviors you may witness every day.

Why does my cat purr?

Your cat’s purr may be one of your favorite things about hime or her.  Where that distinctive sound originates is still debated, but cat owners know that unmistakeable trill, which begins when the cat is about a week old. Cats purr when they are content and happy, but also when they are stressed by fear or pain. The frequency of the purr has been linked to stimulated bone growth and healing, and it is also believed that endorphins are released while the sound is produced. So, despite the obvious communicative properties of a good healthy purr, it may actually be contributing to your pet’s overall well-being, as a self-soothing, self-healing, relaxing therapy. You probably already know that a purring cat can have similarly soothing, healing, relaxing powers on you too!

Why does my cat knead me with his paws?

kitten bitingNot all cats knead, but the explanation for why those that do is pretty simple. Kittens knead as a sign of contentment, and the action helps their mothers milk flow while they nurse. As the cat matures, kneading is still a signal of contentment at their situation, and it is also a way to mark territory, as cat’s perspire through the pads on their paws. Getting a kitty massage is usually pretty fun, but some cats can be obsessive with kneading, or the behavior may lead to or be done in conjunction with suckling or chewing, which leads us to… Read More »

Learning to Speak Cat: What Your Kitten’s Behavior Is Trying to Tell You

shutterstock_105920375Kittens are cute. It is an undeniable fact that the little balls of soft fur that are clumsy in their own kittenish way are probably one of the cutest animals on the planet. When you bring the kitten home, you may be thinking that there is nothing to know about raising cats as they are often portrayed as being pretty self-reliant.

Cats, however, do talk to you and you should have an understanding of what they are trying to say. These communications are not always going to be verbal displays, they will also include the animals’ mannerisms, or how it presents itself.

Punishments

You may be tempted to try disciplining your kitten in order to break it of any bad habits that may be present. Some suggest making a loud noise by either clapping or banging something, while others suggest using a spray bottle to stop undesirable behaviors.

Whichever method you choose you will want to be sure that you never shake, yell at, or kick the kitten. Kittens, much like human babies, are incredibly delicate. Shaking, hitting, or kicking the kitten can cause serious problems. You will also want to be careful to avoid doing things that cause your kitten to become skittish or afraid of you.
Read More »

Three Ways Your Dog is Training You

dog training fail from memdiary.comEver hear that joke about how a group of aliens visits Earth and see us (humans) feeding, bathing, picking up poop, and otherwise caring for our pets and they make the assumption that the dogs and cats are the ones in charge here on Earth? The thing about humor is that its funny because there’s a partial truth in the butt of the joke. Please welcome our guest poster, Brittany West, with an article about how our pets just might train us and not the other way around:

As pet owners, we like to think we have our animals well-trained. My dog uses the doggie door without a problem, and the cat comes on cue. But if I had a nickel for every time someone jokingly said that the animals have me trained, I would be exceedingly wealthy. That is one of the most common phrases that pet owners use amongst each other, and for good reason. Here are just some of the ways that your pet may be training you.
Read More »

5 cat facts that will blow you away!

1377226_10151948253781469_75442444_nCats. They may have taken over the internet (LOLCats, anyone?), and surpassed dogs as the most popular pet on earth, but we still have a lot of learning to do. Mysterious and aloof, felines have been with us as companions for centuries; from being revered in Ancient Egypt to being implicated in witch trials. Here are 5 little-know cat facts to tuck into your trivia arsenal for your next appearance on Jeopardy!

1.They’re missing their “sweet tooth”

That’s right; cats can’t taste sweets and sugars. Studies have shown that cats will avoid bitter and sour foods, but they show no indication that they have a preference or avoidance for sweets.  Dogs can taste some sweet flavors, and they tend to show a preference for them. That’s why you’ll find fruit-flavored dog treats, but not cat treats. In a way, I envy them. They’ll never taste the sweetness of candy and be tempted to eat a bag-full in the middle of the night when no one else is watching.

 

2. A cat’s purr mimics a baby’s cry

Well, sometimes they do. If your cat is purring when she wants to share your tuna sandwich, she can mimic some of the high frequency vibrations that occur in a human baby’s cry. That subtle difference in tone can be detected by humans and has been described as “less pleasant sounding” and “urgent” in this study when compared to purrs that are not soliciting food and are merely communicating contentment.

1374378_10151946442031469_2011686158_n3. Siamese cats are albino, sort of

It’s technically called temperature-sensitive albinism. It is caused by a mutated gene and resulting enzyme. All Siamese kittens are born white, and they develop their coloring over time. The enzyme, called tryosinase, is temperature sensitive and will only activate at below average body temperatures. This causes the coolest parts of the cat to develop color and distinct markings (generally the nose, feet, and tail).

Interestingly enough, this harmless, mutated gene is also the cause of the Siamese cat’s blue eyes. All kittens are born with blue eyes, but this albinism gene keeps the eyes from developing another pigment. It is also responsible for the red flash seen in a Siamese cats’ photograph, rather than the green glow that you usually get when you take your cat’s photograph at night.
Read More »

Clumps, crystals and more – your guide to choosing the best cat litter

Classic Tabby Scottish FoldCat litter: every cat parent needs it, every new cat owner is overwhelmed by the vast number of choices, and every multiple cat owner is trying to find the most effective brand. You’ve got clumping vs. non clumping, clay vs. silica vs. biodegradable vs. flushable… where do you even start?

If you’re a new cat caregiver with a shiny new kitten, choosing the type of litter you want to use will likely depend on your personal preferences and it will be easy to litter train your kitten because they haven’t developed a preference for a particular texture yet. What I’m trying to say (gracefully) is that cats can be downright snobby about the type of litter they’ll use.

I’m sure you’re all gasping at the implications. You’re probably saying, “My cat, a snob? Never!” I’m not being judgmental, but in my experience with cats, they generally tend to be extremely picky about everything in their environment. My cats don’t tolerate change and if they don’t get their way they’re going to go on a hunger strike or pee in my purse. Trust me; it’s not as fun as it sounds. To illustrate: they will only use one type of litter (Feline Pine) eat one kind of food (Friskies, the pate, not chunked), and any guest spending the night leaves me wondering where and when I’ll find the proverbial pee in the purse!

How do you change the type of litter you use without protest from the felines?

Examining the damage to the litter bagOh no, so you have an adult cat and want to change litters for some of the reasons we’ll discuss later in the article? All is not lost! You can gradually introduce a new type of litter; it just takes a little bit of time. Here are the steps; it’s pretty similar to how you might change up your dog or cat’s food. Read More »

Carbon Monoxide and Pets

white dog sleepingDo you ever consider the dangers of carbon monoxide to pets? One of our Facebook fans recently shared with us a tragic story of 12 pet birds lost to carbon monoxide poisoning. The heartbreaking tale also involved the family dog who, after some time has made a full recovery. This blog post is intended to raise awareness of the dangers of Carbon Monoxide poisoning not just for people, but for the pets we keep as well. Most cases of carbon monoxide toxicity in pets occur, sadly, due to human error, and the results can be devastating.  A dog left in an enclosed garage with a running automobile, for example, can be exposed to toxic levels of carbon monoxide in about ten minutes. But animals may also exposed to toxic levels of carbon monoxide when they are trapped in a building that is on fire, or when a slow leak from a heating system amongst other causes. It’s important to make yourself familiar with easy ways to prevent exposure, as well as a course of action should evacuation or medical attention be necessary.

What is Carbon Monoxide?

Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless, non-irritating gas produced by the incomplete combustion of carbon fuels. It is potentially toxic and may even cause death. Carbon monoxide may be produced by unventilated kerosene or propane heaters, gasoline engines, automobile exhaust, or fumes from carbon-based fuel heating systems. When inhaled, Carbon Monoxide gas is readily absorbed into the bloodstream, combining with hemoglobin and rapidly reducing oxygen delivery to the body,leading to decreased oxygen to the brain and heart. Prolonged exposure to carbon monoxide leads to hypoxemia (critically low blood oxygen levels) and eventually death.

What are the signs and symptoms of Carbon Monoxide poisoning?

Depending upon the concentration and duration of exposure of carbon monoxide, the symptoms may manifest quickly, or gradually over a period of prolonged exposure. Some pets, such as birds, are more sensitive to Carbon Monoxide levels and relatively small exposure may prove detrimental. Acute behavioral and physical symptoms include:

•Sleepiness
•Weakness
•Lethargy
•Labored breathing
•Seizures
•Depression
•Deafness
•Erratic movements
•Coma

Pregnant animals, especially those in late gestation, may abort their babies pre term. Examination of your pet’s skin and mucous membranes such as nostrils, ears, genitals may show bright red coloration, though this symptom may not be apparent on most pets.

Consistant exposure to lower levels of carbon monoxide include flu like symptoms like nausea, vomiting, aches, weakness and loss of stamina. Blood acidosis is also a side effect.

Diagnosis and Treatment

Carbon monoxide detectorCarbon monoxide is life-threatening and treatment will require immediate veterinary attention. If you know or suspect that your pet is suffering from carbon monoxide toxicity, the first step is to move your pets away from the source of the carbon monoxide to a place where they can breathe fresh air. As soon as possible, transport them to the vet for oxygen therapy and fluids. The oxygen will remove the carbon monoxide from the blood, bringing your pet’s oxygen levels back to normal. Your vet will also collect blood samples for a complete blood count and biochemistry, as establishing the levels of carbon monoxide, carboxyhemoglobin and acids in the blood will dictate the initial treatment plan and continued treatment. Urinalysis and other applicable body fluid tests may also be performed. In some cases, your veterinarian may perform an electrocardiogram (ECG) to determine if your pet’s heart function has also been affected.

Your vet will instruct you on extended care. Generally, while your pet is recovering from the carbon monoxide poisoning, activity should be limited for several weeks following the exposure. Shorter walks, limited play and exercise, and a little extra TLC will be required until your pet is fully recovered. Observe your pet closely during recovery for residual signs of nervous system issues, and if you see any anomalies, contact your vet as soon as possible.

Prevention

Obviously, the best course of action is to prevent your pets and the rest of your family from exposure of any detrimental levels of carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide detectors are the first line of defense against this elusive killer, and should be installed in various areas of your home. Minimize or prevent exposure to carbon monoxide by ensuring that your heating system, water heater and any other gas, oil, or coal burning appliances are serviced annually by a qualified technician. Don’t use generators, charcoal grills or other gasoline or charcoal-burning devices inside your home, basement, or garage or near a window where gasses could accumulate in an enclosed area.
And don’t run a vehicle inside a garage attached, even if you leave the door open, and especially if the garage is attached to your house. Provide adequate ventilation for any fuel powered device and be sure to know what to do should an unfortunate exposure to carbon monoxide should occur.

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning can occur any time of year and is often due to human error. Protect you and your family, including four-footed members through prevention and close attention to potential sources.

White dog sleeping image referenced from wikipedia and originally posted by Eli Duke

Iams & Eukanuba dog and cat food recalls : August 2013

iamscatThe health and safety of your pets is very important to That Pet Place. We regret to inform you that P&G has announced a limited, voluntary recall of select Iams dry cat & dry dog and Eukanuba dry dog foods because they have the potential to be contaminated with Salmonella. No health effects related to salmonella have been reported on these products. P&G is taking this precautionary step in order to ensure our customers and consumers get the highest level of quality and service. We apologize for the inconvenience this may cause.

Lot Code ExampleThe lot codes of the recalled products include: 3186 4177, 3187 4177, 3188 4177, 3189 Eukanuba4177, 3190 4177, 3191 4177, 3192 4177, 3193 4177, 3193 4177, 3194 4177, & 3195 4177. The lot code is located on the front or back of the bag at the top of the bag and is the bottom left number.

For more information on how to find your bag’s lot codes, please see Iam’s recall listing for dog foods, Iam’s recall listing for cat foods or Eukanuba’s recall listing for affected dog foods.

What to do if you have an affected product:
If you determine that you have one of the affected products you may return the product to That Fish Place – That Pet Place retail store or the store where you purchased your pet food for replacement or reimbursement for your purchase.

If you need additional information regarding this recall please visit Iams or Eukanuba’s websites.  We will keep you updated if there are any updates related to this recall. 

Catnip – Interesting Facts and FAQs about Your Cat’s Herb of Choice

CatnipDoes your cat go cuckoo for Catnip? If you have you know how much fun it is to watch them rolling and twisting, rubbing, batting, clawing and biting those fuzzy and aromatic leaves. But have you ever wondered why cats react the way they do to the plant? Read on to find out more about your cat’s favorite flora!

About the Plant

Catnip, Nepeta cataria, also known as Catmint, is a member of the mint family, one of about 250 species. It is native to Europe but has naturalized here in the US and in many other places. You can often find it along roadsides and in fields if you know how to recognize it, most of us would see it as nothing more than a roadside weed. The plants grow up to about 40 inches tall, with angular stems, soft, fuzzy, triangular-shaped leaves with scalloped-edges, and clusters of tiny pinkish-purple flower heads through summer. Of course, the easiest way to identify it is that characteristic smell! Your cat reacts to the potent essential oil, nepetalactone that gives catnip its distinctive aroma and has a powerful effect on the behavior of many cats.

It Only Takes a Little Whiff

Researchers aren’t sure why a cat’s brain responds as it does to this herb, but it’s thought that the oils in catnip mimic the feline “happy” pheromones.  When they smell that oil it stimulates the receptors in the brain that respond to those pheromones, triggering the behaviors and physical responses you love to watch. Read More »

Scroll To Top