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Pet Friendly Hotels in Lancaster, PA

If you read our past blog Pet Friendly Destinations in Lancaster, PA you may be wondering where you and your pets can stay while visiting these awesome attractions. Here are some hotels, motels and campgrounds that will gladly accommodate you and your pets!

Sources:
http://www.bringfido.com/
http://www.gopetfriendly.com/
Image © Flicker | Tony Faiola

 

12 Pet Friendly Vacation Spots in the Mid-Atlantic

Summer is in full swing and many of our readers may be looking for dog-friendly vacation spots. Read on for a list (which is by no means is comprehensive) of pet friendly stops near Central PA. Whether you’re looking to spend a few days hiking the trails with your furry friend or just a day trip in the summer sun your family is bound to enjoy these fun summer destinations.

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  • The Amish Farm & House
    This site exists to provide the public with a quality educational experience reflecting both the historical and contemporary Amish culture in Lancaster County. You will see the farmhouse, built in 1805, the 15-acre picturesque farm with many of the historic buildings remaining, and a 1775 operational bake oven. Well behaved, leashed pets are welcome on the grounds, but not in the buildings.
  • Beau’s Dream Dog Park at Buchanan Park
    The newly renovated dog park, which Lancaster, PA resident Angela Bauman’s 2012 winning entry helped inspire, features an array of amusement park-themed elements, including: a 40-foot-long roller coaster bridge; custom-designed splash pads for large and small dogs that feature fun spray nozzles; an expansive deck for relaxing; a tennis ball tree, among many other exciting features. In honor of Bauman’s four-legged playmate Beau, the City of Lancaster renamed the dog park Beau’s Dream Dog Park.
  • Cape Henlopen State Park
    Located on the Delaware seashore you can take Fluffy for a dip on non-lifeguarded beaches as long she is kept on a leash 6 ft or shorter. No dogs are permitted on the lifeguarded beaches, sailboarding beaches or shorebird nesting areas during peak season (May 1- September 30).
  • Deep Creek
    Deep Creek Lake is the perfect vacation destination for people looking to travel with their dogs. We consider our pets part of the family, so why leave them behind? Booking a dog-friendly rental home is the ideal solution – don’t leave your furry friend back home at boarding facility, let him/her experience the fun activities at Deep Creek Lake along with you! With quiet streets, pet-friendly businesses, a wide open lake and miles of hiking trails, Deep Creek, Maryland is a dog’s heaven on earth.
  • Elm’s Beach Park
    Located on the Chesapeake Bay there are 476 acres of pet-friendly fun. Dogs are permitted but must be kept on a leash.
  • Flag Ponds Nature Park
    Another park located on the Chesapeake Bay, you can enjoy both short and long hikes through freshwater ponds areas, forested heights, and sandy beaches with your dog. Dogs must be leashed at all times.
  • John H. Downs Memorial Park & Dog Beach
    also situated on the Bay, Downs offers paved and natural trails and a dog beach. On the dog beach you can even let your dog off leash if you’d like.
  • Kitchen Kettle Village
    You’ll enjoy this quaint shopping village which has all the hand-made items you would expect in Pennsylvania’s Amish Country. You’ll find quilts, leather goods, home decor, meats and cheeses, baked goods, a jam and relish kitchen, homemade ice cream, and kettle corn. There is also a petting zoo and carriage rides. Well behaved, leashed pets are welcome to join you on the grounds and and on the carriage rides.
  • Knoebels Amusement Resort
    With no admission fee, this pay-as-you-ride amusement park is popular with the dogs, too! Dogs are permitted inside the park but must be kept on a leash and you pick up after your pooch.
  • Lake Erie: Presque State Park
    A bit of a distance from Central PA, but the pristine beaches may be worth the drive. Pooches are allowed on all non-lifeguarded beaches with a 6 ft or shorter leash.
  • The Landing Restaurant (New Hope, PA)
    A rare occurrence in our area: a restaurant where you can dine with your furry best friends. Dine on The Landing’s riverside terrace where your pet is treated like a guest, not a pest. Be sure to say hello to Fred, the Burmese Mountain Dog who mingles with guests on the terrace.
  • Long Beach Island, NJ Dog Parks
    Long Beach Island has two dog parks. Barnegat Light’s dog park, on the north end of the island, has a double gated entrance for safety. Long Beach Township’s Dog Park has installed dune fencing so that the dogs can go from the beach to the water in relative safely. All licensed and well-behaved dogs are welcome.

Be sure to take plenty of water, treats, toys, and don’t forget bags to clean up after the dogs! Plan ahead if you think you would like to spend the night. There are many hotel chains that are becoming pet friendly, but some have restrictions of the type or number of animals you may have with you while others charge an additional pet fee.

If you have a favorite dog friendly destination spot, be sure to leave it in the comments, we’d love to try out some new doggie vacation spots!

 Sources:
http://www.petfriendlytravel.com/dog_beaches  
http://www.whenandwhere.com
http://www.bringfido.com/
http://www.gopetfriendly.com/

Common Pet Parasites and Pests – Warm Weather Worries

Parasites can afflict pets any time of the year, however during the spring and summer months, they tend to be more prevalent. Our pets spend a lot more time outside when the weather is warm, and parasites breed more readily. Even if your pets spend all or most of their time indoors, it is possible for parasites to find them whether carried in on our clothes or by crawling through our screen doors. Here are some common parasites to look out for and ways to combat them this summer. Read More »

Pet Friendly Destinations in Lancaster, PA

I want to take my dog everywhere! Let’s face it – he’s a part of the family. And the last thing I want to do is pay an expensive boarding company to keep my dog while I’m away. Why should I have all the fun? That’s why I put together this simple resource guide to help myself, and other pet owners, track down worthwhile places where the 4-legged family member can tag along too. As a bonus, I’ve added some personal thoughts on places around Lancaster County that I’ve found are GREAT for dogs!

Resources for finding pet friendly places

Bringfido.com is the ultimate resource to use when planning your vacation. They have anything, and everything you could possibly think of. From lodging to emergency pet care, it really has it all.
Dogfriendly.com has been around the longest, and is filled to the brim with awesome travel information. Feel like taking a pet friendly vacation abroad? Their database includes pet friendly travel destinations worldwide!
Petfriendlytravel.com not only shares tips for travel, but they include pet friendly vacation rentals by state. Yes, I would love a rental by t10010329_847073901986368_1949000252_ohe beach, Thank you!
Gopetfriendly.com has the best traveling tool called the Road Trip Planner. Just enter your departure and your destination, and check off the boxes that you are interested in. Like magic all of your pet friendly destinations are listed on your map. It’s awesome!
Petswelcome.com is the perfect site to use if you have a particular destination in mind. They list all of the top travel destinations, and you can even search by route. Stop at a pet friendly attraction on your way to your pet friendly destination.

If you are from Lancaster than you might already know of some of the pet friendly businesses that we have in the area. Visiting us for the first time? Don’t you worry your pretty little head, because I have your back.

 

Pet friendly places in Lancaster County

That Fish Place – That Pet Place

Pets of all walks of life are welcome in our 88,000 square foot store. You can shop until you drop, while your pet gets to socialize with other animals and our friendly staff.

Kitchen Kettle Village

Great place to bring the dog! They have places all over to put poop bags, and their entire place is accessible. Pick up some apple butter for yourself while you’re there, it’s the best!

Referenced from Kitchen Kettle's Facebook page.

Referenced from Kitchen Kettle’s Facebook page.

Amish House & Landis Valley Museum

The pups love the open air as much as I love the beautiful scenery. Dogs are allowed on the grounds of all of these two locations, but not in the individual buildings. I always travel in a small group so that no one gets left out.

Beau’s Dream Dog Park at Buchanan Park

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Referenced from Beau’s Dream Dog Park’s Facebook page

The park features a large dog play area, as well as a small dog play area. The park is chock–full of splash gardens, obstacles, and a tree that launches tennis balls! The dogs all love this park, and it breaks their hearts when it’s time to leave.

Long’s Park

This park has been a Lancaster County staple since the 1900’s. It’s beautiful from its head down to its toes. During the summer the fun never stops with their free summer concert series. That’s right, I said free summer concerts. The pups love it!

Lancaster is not shy of any walking trails, thanks in part to the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy. Enjoy the beautiful outdoors with your favorite furry friend, and be sure to check out some of the other local dog friendly parks along the way.

Referenced from Lancaster Brewing Company's Facebook Page.

Referenced from Lancaster Brewing Company’s Facebook Page.

I don’t know about you, but all of this exercise is making me hungry! Believe it or not, there are plenty of outdoor cafés and eateries throughout Lancaster. Four54 Grill, Prince Street Café, Pig Iron Brewing Co, and Lancaster Brewing Company are just a few. If you have a bit of a sweet tooth, check out the newly renovated Splits & Giggles. With so many eateries that offer outdoor seating, there is no reason to dine without my pup.

After a long day of activities, we all need a good hard rest. Check into one of our local pet friendly hotels like Best Western Premier Eden Resort & Suites. Most of these hotels charge a small fee, but allow dogs of various sizes to stay. The best way to check on a specific hotel’s policy is to call and ask. The one I have listed here is not the only one. It’s still Always a great idea to call ahead first to determine their policies.

So what are you waiting for? Come to Lancaster and enjoy your stay.

Travelling with your dogs – long distance road trips

800 miles into the trip, they finally figured out how to keep me in the back seat.Vacations are great: time for rest, relaxation and recharging. However, some pet owners, including myself, feel guilty leaving our furry friends behind while exploring other parts of the country. I’ve discussed hiring pet sitters and boarding facilities before, but there is another option. Consider it the road less travelled.
What about taking your pets with you? Air travel can be expensive and sometimes dangerous for short-nosed dog breeds. What about a good old-fashioned road trip? After you read this, you might reconsider that boarding facility or pet sitter, but for those instances where you really want to share the road with your four-legged best friend, this post will be your go-to resource for planning the perfect road trip.

There are 5 main steps to preparing for your long-distance road trip:

1. Get the all-clear from your vet. Schedule a well-pet visit for any of the pets that you’ll be taking on the road with you. If you’ll be travelling across the Canadian border, make sure you have copies of your current rabies vaccination certificates. Make copies of any other vaccinations and check with the places you’re staying to make sure your pets are up to date on any vaccinations that they require.
2. Plan your route carefully. Pet friendly hotels are more and more common, but you’re going to need to plan ahead. Don’t just rely on a hotel’s information online, make sure to call ahead and get confirmation that your pets are welcome.

You may want to consider camping during your trip or renting an RV for a cross-country trip, especially if you have multiple dogs or large breed dogs. You still need to call ahead and make sure that your pets are welcome. As unfair as it is, some breeds aren’t allowed in some counties, hotels, or campgrounds.
3. You’ll want to first make a list of everything you’ll need for your pet while on vacation, and secondly pack enough of it for the entire duration of your trip. Here’s a quick list that I came up with:

4. Make sure your microchip information is up-to-date. If your pet isn’t microchipped, make sure to get one done at your vet’s office. If they are already microchipped, update your information online to include your cell phone number in case they escape while away from home.
5. Practice makes perfect! If your dog isn’t used to car rides, take small trips in preparation for the long haul. Slowly build up the amount of time that you’re in the car until you’re confident that your pet will tolerate a long road trip.

While you’re on the road, make sure to give plenty of water and stop every few hours for a stretch and to relieve them. Take a short walk at each rest stop to reduce anxiousness. If you can, go for a run or do some exerting activity so that they’re nice and tired for the next leg of the trip!

Do you have any words of wisdom for any pet lovers getting ready to go on a road trip with their furry companions? Leave them in the comments!

Road Trip! Tips for traveling with your dog

Barret - in the JeepIt’s officially summer and often families will hit the road and enjoy some rest & relaxation. It’s becoming more and more common place to bring your pet along. Traveling with your dog can be rewarding and fun, and many hotels and campsites are becoming pet friendly, but what about during the car ride itself?

Traveling with your pets in the car can be stress-free if you follow some easy-to-follow safety guidelines:

1. Head for a pre-trip vet check. The vet will make sure that you pet is up to date on all required vaccinations and will give you a health certificate indicating your pet is healthy. Be sure to bring this certificate with you, along with vaccination records and microchip information.

2. Exercise your dog before you get in the car. Take a quick trip to the dog park or a nice long walk around the community park to make sure your pet has had a chance to empty his bladder and bowels and is nice and calm once you get on the road.

3. Make stops often so your dog can stretch out his legs and empty his bladder. He can’t answer you when call out “anyone need to use this rest stop?” so you should probably stop.

4. Use safety restraints in the car. In some states (ones that you might be travelling through) require dog seat belts, safety restraints or Dog car seats. If you’re using a kennel or carrier, make sure that it is securely strapped to the seat in case of an accident. Also, never let your pet sit in the front seat or on your lap. In the event the airbag would deploy your pet could be seriously injured or even killed. Lastly, do not strap your dog or cat carrier to the top of your car or in a trailer.  Read More »

Travelling With Pets | Know Your Options When Travelling Long Distance

Travel PetsPlease welcome James Ryder for this guest blog post:

Moving or travelling abroad as well as air travel in the states  is difficult and stressful enough for human beings alone. But when there are animals involved things get even more complicated. Taking pets across international borders involves a number of health and safety considerations, but mostly it can be highly stressful for the animals themselves, cooped up in unfamiliar circumstances for days on end, subjected to the hostile environments of aeroplane cargo holds, or even quarantined for up to six months. Most of that stress, however, can be substantially reduced by proper research, using the services of a qualified pet transport company, and simply taking your time when it comes to preparing for a move or travel internationally. Here are a few tips concerning various methods of pet transport: find the right one for you and your beloved companion based on point of destination, type of animal, and cost factors.
Read More »

Choosing a Pet Sitter or Boarding Facility

Dog walkerWe’re in the very early stages of planning an extended vacation…and our regular pet sitter will be on the trip with us! So we’re weighing our options and looking into pet sitters and boarding facilities. But how do you know if they’re reliable, responsible and that your pets will be well cared for?

It’s up to your personal preference whether you’d like a pet sitter or a boarding facility. There are many quality options out there for both venues. A sitter might be a better option if your pet is very uncomfortable outside their regular environments and they might agree to water your plants as well as your pets. Read More »

iPhone Apps are Going to the Dogs!

pet blogI spend a lot of time with my phone. Probably too much time, to be honest. I rely on it for everything from deciding what restaurant to try this weekend to communicating with clients. While I don’t always like being connected to my phone 24/7, it does have its advantages, especially when you’re on the run with dogs in tow! I thought it might be fun to open up my phone and share with you the apps that I use most for my pets. Read More »

A Legacy of Cats in Rome From Antiquity to Present Day

Cat Mosaic from PompeiiDomesicated cats have a deeply rooted history in culture. Most of us are familiar with depictions and roles of ancient felines in Egyptian society, but did you know that cats were also prevalent in ancient Rome?

Domesticated cats were carried to Europe by Phoenician trade ships about 3000 years ago. This African subspecies mingled with European subspecies giving rise to the domestic cats we still keep today. There is some debate whether, in ancient times, cats were considered pests or prized predators. It is evident that these pets were valued for their hunting prowess, often tolerated for keeping rodent populations at bay and left free to roam temples and estates for the same reason. Roman soldiers transported cats on conquests to keep grain stores safe. There are also other positive associations of cats in lore that supports that they were more than just a presence, though not perhaps favored as pampered pets as much in Roman society as dogs, birds and other exotic pets at the time. Cats are associated with the goddesses Diana (goddess of the hunt) and Libertas (goddess of freedom). Regardless of how the Romans of that age felt about cats, their place in culture had been established. Read More »

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