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July 4th Fun & Fireworks – Pet Anxiety & Safety Tips

The July 4th Holiday is upon us, and unfortunately it is one of the busiest times for animal shelters due to the overwhelming amount of dogs lost during the fireworks & festivities. The fireworks may be fun for us, for some of our canine friends it can be downright terrifying.

During fireworks displays, or even while setting off fireworks in your backyard and neighborhood, your usually calm family pet may become extremely stressed. The stress overload can cause some pets to try to escape the house or yard. By following a few simple tips for this holiday weekend you can avoid coming home to an empty house and the anxiety of a missing beloved family pet.

SAFEjuly4

  • Avoid bringing your pet to fireworks displays, even if they are not usually startled by loud noises or thunder.
  • Keep your pet indoors in a quiet, safe, sheltered area. Keep doors and windows closed and locked (I’ve heard stories of dogs opening slider doors or even jumping through windows to escape). Leave the TV on or play soothing music at a normal level to distract him from the noise outside
  • Prepare a safe “den” for your pet. If they choose to hide under the bed, in their crate or somewhere else in the house, allow them to. If your dog is not crate trained, and you would like him to be please visit our comprehensive crate training guide.
  • Feed your pet before the displays begin and keep a special chew treat on hand as a distraction.
  • Nervous or stressed dogs may chew to ease anxiety. Make sure to provide proper chew toys and make sure all cords and other dangerous objects are out of reach
  • Try a calming aid to help calm anxiety, or ask your vet for medication to help with your pet’s noise phobia.
  • Do not leave your pet outside during the festivities. Even with a fence or a tie-out a dog can go to great lengths to escape the source of their anxiety.
  • Always make sure your pet is wearing a properly fitted dog collar with up-to-date ID tags. Consider having your pet microchipped for extra security.
  • Try not to reward anxiety with extra attention. It may be hard not to cuddle or fawn over your pet when he is scared, but do your best to ignore axious behavior or practice distraction techniques to turn their focus away from commotions.

Follow these simple steps to enjoy a worry free Independence Day. The knowledge that your family pets are safe and sound will make your holiday all the more fun. Have a great holiday weekend!

Severe Weather can also be very stressful on our pets. Check out this post for tips on keeping you pets calm during severe weather.

Pet Boarding Facilities in the Lancaster, PA Area

Looking for a boarding facility in the Lancaster, PA area? We’ve put together a resource of some local options to make your search easier. Please be sure to research if pet boarding is the right solution for you and to tour any facility you are considering boarding your pets in. Please note, That Fish Place – That Pet Place is not affiliated with or endorsing any of these facilities and is not compensated for their inclusion.

 

Canine Country Club, Inc.

888 N. Penryn Road
Manheim, Pennsylvania 17545
(717) 665-2710
www.caninecountryclubinc.com

“Canine Country Club, Inc. is a family owned and operated pet rooming, daycare, and grooming / spa facility located in beautiful Manheim, Pennsylvania. With humble beginning and a string faith, the business had grown to become the area’s finest pet vacation resort. Founders and co-owners Gary & Kim Buchen live on-location in their restored 1800s farm house.”

  • Dog & Cat Boarding
  • Daycare
  • Grooming

Prices start at $26 per night for dogs and $20 per night for cats
*2 night Minimum

 

Country Club Pet Lodge

440 Stoney Ln.
Lancaster PA 17603
(717) 872-5471
countryclubpetlodge.com

“Here at Country Club Pet Lodge your pet will feel right at home. We have spacious indoor and outdoor spaces for your pet to roam. We also offer additional playtime in our yard as well as walks for your pets. (Walks and free play are extra) Your pet will be greatly taken care of by our friendly staff. Our first priority is that your pet has the best experience possible.”

  • Dog Boarding
  • Grooming
  • Training

Prices start at $19 per day for dogs

 

Country Pet Hideaway

748 Vinemont Rd.
Reinholds, PA 17569
(610) 775-2876
RamminRetrievers@comcast.net
www.countrypethideaway.com

“Welcome to Country Pet Hideaway, we are a full service boarding and grooming kennel located in Reinholds, Pa. We offer a clean and relaxing atmosphere on our 16 acre property. Our kennels are equipped with ADT for smoke detection and temperature monitoring. We also installed a computer controlled automatic generator back up system in case of power outages. All of our buildings have heat and air conditioning which keeps your pets healthy and happy. Radio is played 24 hours a day for both cats and dogs.”

  • Dog & Cat Boarding
  • Grooming
  • Heated pool
  • Training

Prices start at $25 per day for dogs and $14 per day for cats

 

Harbor Woods Boarding Kennel

109 Oak Road
Conestoga, PA 17516
717-872-0674
harborwoodssteve@gmail.com
harborwoodskennel.com

“While you’re on vacation, your dog will receive the careful, thoughtful attention at a reasonable price naturally provided by a modest-sized, single-owner boarding kennel. Your dog will be housed in one of our 30 spacious runs and will have two individual walks each day at no extra charge.”

  • Dog Boarding

Prices start at $20 per day for dogs
Cash or check only.

 

Kieffer’s Kennel Boarding & Grooming

520 W 28th Division Hwy
Lititz, PA 17543
717-626-6961
www.kiefferskennel.com

“At Kieffer’s Kennel Boarding and Grooming, it is our mission to be committed to provide the uppermost excellences in canine services available.
We know that boarding your much-loved family member can be a traumatic proposition – for both you and your dog. You can rest assured that we take seriously the accountability of providing a harmless and loving environment for your pet.”

  • Dog Boarding
  • Grooming

Price start at $18.50 per night for dogs

 

Locust Run Kennels

1120 Canadochly Rd
York, PA 17406-8683
717-252-4597
locustruncustomerservice@comcast.net
locustrunkennels.com

“Our climate-controlled cattery and indoor kennels ensures that your pet will be safe and happy regardless of the weather! You don’t ever have to worry about your pet being left outside in the sweltering heat or the bitter cold.
At Locust Run Kennels, our professionals understand that not all pets require the same care. We are able to administer medicine dosages, both orally and by injection, to your senior or special needs pet.”

  • Dog & Cat Boarding
  • Grooming

Prices start at $15.25 per day for dogs and $11.50 per day for cats

 

Neffsville Veterinary Clinic

2555 Lititz Pike
Lancaster, PA 17601
(717) 569-5381
info@neffsvillevet.com
www.neffsvillevet.com

“Neffsville Veterinary Clinic is so much more than just a medical facility for your pet.  Aside from our comprehensive medical service offerings, NVC is proud to be your trusted resource for everything relating to your pet.  From food to lodging and right on to grooming and shopping, NVC is your one- stop for all our pet care needs.”

  • Dog & Cat Boarding
  • Small Pet & Reptile Boarding
  • Grooming
  • Day Care
  • Nutrition
  • Training
  • Veterinary
  • Boutique

Prices start at $25 per night for dogs and $20 per night for cats. Small pet & reptile boarding available upon request

 

Oscar’s Pet Resort

521 Willow Road
Lancaster, PA 17601
(717) 397-0726
info@oscarspetresort.com
www.oscarspetresort.com

“Oscar’s Pet Resort is an all-inclusive pet resort in Lancaster County, PA, providing luxurious overnight accommodations, doggie daycare programs, state-of-the-art grooming from certified dog groomers and a variety of training programs and workshops to suit your pet’s needs.”

  • Training
  • Grooming
  • Dog & Cat Boarding
  • Daycare
  • Sports & Rec

Prices start at $44 per night for dogs $24 per night for cats

 

Don’t see your favorite Lancaster, PA- area boarding facility on the list? Please let us know in the comments and we’ll add it. Have a great Summer!

 

 

Lessons Learned Moving Cross-County with Dogs

Hi Pet Blog Readers, It’s been a long hiatus since my last post but for a good reason. My husband and I sold everything and followed our hearts and dreams to Alaska, The Last Frontier. I know it sounds crazy, it felt crazy! It was an incredible journey to get to my new home in the 49th state, and that’s what I’m here to tell you about.

Moving Cross Country3 dogs, 2 adults, 1 Subaru and enough belongings to get by for 2 months; we could have been a very entertaining Subaru commercial, had there been any room for camera equipment!

The 4,579 miles from our lifelong home in Lancaster, Pennsylvania to Chugiak, Alaska would take just over 6 days to complete, with no time for sightseeing. That kind of a journey doesn’t just happen on a whim; it took months of careful planning and preparation to ensure our safe journey across North America. I’d like to share some of the lessons I learned driving cross-country with my dogs.

 

 

Keep Pets Safe in the Car

Safety is the number one concern for driving cross-country. Our dogs are notoriously rambunctious in the car and we feared having to battle to keep them in the backseat while driving on a busy highway. I researched backseat barriers and travel harnesses at length.

The harnesses didn’t appear to be a good option for us because we would have three dogs in the backseat for days at a time. We didn’t want to limit any of their sleeping options; like the floor of the backseat. We didn’t know if they would tangle themselves while racing from window to window, and we didn’t have time to experiment. So, instead, we opted to install a backseat barrier. Being cost-cautious and of the mindset that any visual barrier would deter our dogs, I chose a mesh one with buckle fasteners.

We did test drives using the barrier with success in our home town. However, once we boarded the car with our luggage, everything changed and the dogs became more aware of every weakness in our system.

Lesson Learned: Do Your Research

If I had it to do over again, I’d gladly shell out the extra cash for a solid barrier properly installed in the car. Within the first 5 minutes, Gatsby and figured out how to maneuver into the front seat, the other two not far behind. We had to sacrifice some shoelaces to shore up the weak points.

Proper Hydration and Nutrition for Travelling Pets

Gatsby in the Front
We found a large cup that fit snuggly into the backseat cup holders. Every time we stopped we filled up the cups in the back and the dogs could drink whenever they needed to during the ride. It was messy, but effective.

If you can, leave enough space in your luggage for 1 gallon per 3 days of water using the water that your dogs drink at home. I should have taken 9 gallons of water, but I only stashed 3. I assumed I would refill at hotels and stops along the road.

 

Dogs WatersideThe reason for storing their regular drinking water is to avoid the very slight chance that the dogs would get sick; caused by the different chemistries of water from state to state. We were also traveling through remote areas of Canada and I didn’t know anything about the water quality in that region.

 

I wish I had taken more water not because of the water quality but because I forgot to refill our gallons more than once. This oversight caused us to need to purchase spring water from the next gas station; an unnecessary expense in added to an already expensive trip.

 

Lesson Learned: Pack more foodShowing the effects of a long trip

We packed enough dog food for our trip, plus one extra week. We had one week of food left when we got to Alaska, and the two local pet stores don’t sell our brand! Gasp!

Traditionally, to avoid gastrointestinal distress, you should slowly wean your pets off their old food and on to a new food over a period of 1 to 2 weeks. I didn’t have that kind of time.

We used the three or four days we had to wean them faster than usual. Luckily, we averted dietary-disaster and the dogs transitioned to a new food without much more than some extra gas. I would’ve appreciated more time to properly research my options and transition to a new dog food.

 

 

Crowded seatPack Light

Bring some of the comforts of home. The keyword there is ‘some’. The small collection of toys and dog chews quickly became overkill and a burden in our heavily laden car. Maybe pare it down to one favorite toy or chew per dog plus a thin blanket.

Leashes & Identification On At All Times

Lesson Learned: At all times means at all times

I let my guard down. I was tired after long days of riding in a car. I checked us into the hotel, entered the room, removed the dogs’ leashes and got ready for bed. I forgot, however, that my husband would be bringing some of the luggage into the room in a few moments.

ArrivedThe card reader beeped and the door opened. In a blur, all three dogs were racing down the hall into the lobby and towards the front door before we had time to react!  One of my dogs is skittish and the first slight noise sent her scurrying back to me where I held onto her collar. My husband ran after the two excited escapees and was able to herd them back into the hallway where I could lure them back into the room with desperate offerings of treats and food.

I don’t like to think about losing my dogs, but I’m prepared. Microchips are great and I have heard a lot of wonderful stories about microchip reunions, but the remote areas I was traveling through wouldn’t have regular access to microchip readers, or even internet access. I relied on a backup of up-to-date ID tags. I had just my dog’s name and our cell phone numbers

Worlds Largest Truckstop SignTime Zones May Change, But A Dog’s Internal Clock Doesn’t

We travelled across 4 time zones, but our dogs were still hungry at noon instead of 4:00pm. Prepare for some transition time.

Never Travel Alone

I had the misfortune of coming down with mild food poisoning during our trek through Canada. I would have been in trouble if I were traveling alone. Thankfully my husband did not suffer this fate and was there to help with the dogs and all the added stress that they bring to a cross- country car trip.

 

Road into mountains

So Many Lessons, Not Enough Time

I could probably continue to write about this for days and still have advice left to give. All in all, we were very well prepared and made it safely without any major incidents. The lessons we learned were infinite, and I’m sure yours will be too. I can sum it up with one statement: It was an adventure that I wouldn’t be quick to repeat; but one I wouldn’t trade for the world.

I’m really interested to hear if any of you have your own tales of the road with your furkids and any lessons you’d like to pass on to fellow travelers? Reply below. Safe travels, everyone!

Help Find Sophie Is Helping Find Pets in Lancaster County

The author’s posts are entirely his or her own (unless of course they’ve been hypnotized by their pets) and may not always reflect the views of That Fish Place – That Pet Place.

A lost or runaway pet can be a serious and stressful experience.  Since 2012, Help Find Sophie has used their Facebook page to assist Lancaster County residents reunite with their furry friends.  It is important to help because, let’s be honest, even the most responsible pet owner has the occasional “oopsie”.

For the past few weeks, we have wrestled with this great opportunity to spread awareness. How do we, in one small blog, highlight the vast experience and knowledge we have gained in the hundreds of reunions of which we have been a part? We could utilize our word limit by reminding you to lock your dog or secure your leashes. We could also suggest better maintaining your fences.  Or to stop asking the teenage girl from down the street to house sit, when we know she’s more concerned with watching television than your pet, which has already scaled the backyard wall.

Ultimately, we picked three simple actions that we feel are more important than minding that broken fence post that you were SURE Scruffy couldn’t fit through.

 

Three Ways To NOT Lose Your Pet

ID TAGS

Keep the tags on your pet’s collar! Yes, the jingle of that current rabies tag is possibly the most annoying noise you’ve ever heard (specifically at 2am when your cat decides to have a techno dance party with that moth that flew in your window).  But seriously, just do it. Did you know that all vets register those foreign numbers in a database that can be tracked back to you? We are serious…it’s true. Keep your pet’s rabies tag on for bragging rights, too.

hfsUPDATE YOUR INFO

Update if you move. Update if you change your phone number. Update if you have inherited your great uncle John’s Pomeranian after he went to live at Whistling Breeze Retirement Home.  It’s not hard. Just call the chip company. Call your vet. You wouldn’t move without telling the post office where to forward your mail, would you? You wouldn’t leave for a week in Bahamas without setting up your work email to auto-reply, would you? NOPE….so get on the phone and update Scruffy’s contact info.

 

IDENTIFY YOUR PET

And no we don’t mean with the pink collar with sparkly fake diamonds (Any unique collar that could be used to identify your pet could easily slip off while your pet is loose).  But really IDENTIFY your pet with an implanted micro-chip. DO it now! Get up! Heck, you can even stop reading this blog right now….and get your pet micro-chipped. There are clinics in Lancaster County that run specials offering micro-chipping for as low as $25. That’s less than the pizza and wing special that you will probably order for football on Sunday. Micro-chip!–It’s easy. It’s like giving your pet the voice you sometimes wish they had.

Imagine this scenario: Scruffy runs off to check out the new neighbors, who happen to have a new poodle. Scruffy, who may have collected a few briars and encountered a mud puddle or two, looks like a possible stray.  Your new neighbors, unaware of Scruffy’s curious nature, scoop up your little man and assume he needs shelter. Now wouldn’t it be ideal if Scruffy could speak up and say “Hey I’m just here for the poodle, my name is Scruffy and I live down the street??”  Well guess what, Scruffy can’t do this.  And if he can please contact HFS immediately as we would LOVE to meet with you and promise not to exploit your dog for our own profit. ☺ But…just but what if…Scruffy would have a micro-chip? And these new neighbors take him to the local vet and have him scanned?  Scruffy now has a VOICE. He now has an identity. And you will get the phone call that Scruffy is safe and sound hanging out with the poodle up the street.  IT’S THAT EASY.

 

OUR STORYhfsfb

Help Find Sophie was started in 2012. It was created after a beautiful boxer named Sophie went missing in our county. In a matter of days the number of likes topped a hundred. Lancaster Contains were out in groups, searching for this sweet girl as if she was their own. The number of concerned people that answered the call for help was overwhelming.  Unfortunately Sophie did not have a happy ending and she passed away after being hit by a car. For several weeks the site went untouched and the community mourned. Then, requests started coming in. Other Lancaster County residents began asking to post info about their lost pet. Little by little the page grew. Sophie was in everyone’s thoughts as each reunion unfolded.  She became the legacy. Members often asked, “Sophie please help lead my friend home,” or told us, “Sophie was watching out for this pup.”  So how could the page be deleted?  Hundreds of followers became thousands.  New members joined each day, some who needed help searching and others who wanted to offer their time to help search. Help Find Sophie became more than just a Facebook page looking for Sophie but now a family of members who will look out for each other. Friendships have been made. A small portion of our faith in humanity is restored every time we hear that member is out at 4am searching for a missing dog. Or that another member has rented traps to catch a cat that has been on the run for a week.

 

IS HELP FIND SOPHIE HERE TO SAY?

Well the honest answer is we hope not. We hope every single pet owner takes our advice. We would love to meet up with similar animal lovers for a cup of coffee instead of reading emails and scrolling through the pictures of the pets that are missing. We would much rather get to know you at the dog park instead of saying hi as we try to coax your German shepherd out of a corn field with a piece of cheese. We would love to focus our time and passion on educating and fellowship. And truth be told our husbands would most likely appreciate a conversation that wasn’t centered on “another” missing pet. ☺

So please please Spay, Neuter, Microchip!!!!

I can’t do EVERYTHING but I can do SOMETHING and TOGETHER we can make a difference in the life of a pet.

 

A full list of helpful tips can be found on the Help Find Sophie Facebook Page. Like us! This blog did not mention the importance of spay and neuter because come-on…you guys are smart. You don’t need us to tell you that there are plenty of friends who need homes.

 

helpfindsophie

 

 

Dogs in Politics Day – Fun Facts About First Dogs

Besides Presidents, their First Ladies and children, dogs have resided at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue as well.  It is no wonder that dog ownership is so high amongst the Presidential club.  Unlike their political foes and “allies”, dogs provide loyal companionship that isn’t dependent upon the latest Gallup Poll or focus group.

 

Presidential dogs have often endeared themselves to the electorate.  In honor of Dogs in Politics Day, here are the top five facts about first dogs:

 

5. George Washington’s Foxhounds

The first President had 36 dogs.  George Washington’s favorite breeds were hounds and he used them extensively on fox hunts.  The Father of Our Country, Washington can also be considered the Father of the American Foxhound.  Washington bred his hounds with the French variety, creating a new breed that survives today.

gwfoxhunting1 (1)

4. James Buchanan’s Newfy

Besides being the only bachelor to have become President, James Buchanan had the heaviest dog to ever occupy the Whitehouse.  Lara, a Newfoundland, was 170 lbs.  Perhaps that was the reason he remained a bachelor.

3. FDR’s Scotty

The only dog to have a statue in a national monument is Fala, FDR’s Scottish Terrier. The statue of Fala is a fixture in the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial.

2. George W Bush’s Internet Sensations!

Barney and Miss Beazley, First dogs of George W Bush, were the first presidential dogs to have their own website.

july_08

 

1. Abe’s First Fido

The name Fido is a stereotypical generic name for a dog.  But why is that?  Fido has a Latin base meaning “I trust” or faithful one.  The President who came up with that name for his dog was none other than Abraham Lincoln, one of our most beloved Presidents.
Fido-Lincolns-dog-300x207

Travelling with your dogs – long distance road trips

800 miles into the trip, they finally figured out how to keep me in the back seat.Vacations are great: time for rest, relaxation and recharging. However, some pet owners, including myself, feel guilty leaving our furry friends behind while exploring other parts of the country. I’ve discussed hiring pet sitters and boarding facilities before, but there is another option. Consider it the road less travelled.
What about taking your pets with you? Air travel can be expensive and sometimes dangerous for short-nosed dog breeds. What about a good old-fashioned road trip? After you read this, you might reconsider that boarding facility or pet sitter, but for those instances where you really want to share the road with your four-legged best friend, this post will be your go-to resource for planning the perfect road trip.

There are 5 main steps to preparing for your long-distance road trip:

1. Get the all-clear from your vet. Schedule a well-pet visit for any of the pets that you’ll be taking on the road with you. If you’ll be travelling across the Canadian border, make sure you have copies of your current rabies vaccination certificates. Make copies of any other vaccinations and check with the places you’re staying to make sure your pets are up to date on any vaccinations that they require.
2. Plan your route carefully. Pet friendly hotels are more and more common, but you’re going to need to plan ahead. Don’t just rely on a hotel’s information online, make sure to call ahead and get confirmation that your pets are welcome.

You may want to consider camping during your trip or renting an RV for a cross-country trip, especially if you have multiple dogs or large breed dogs. You still need to call ahead and make sure that your pets are welcome. As unfair as it is, some breeds aren’t allowed in some counties, hotels, or campgrounds.
3. You’ll want to first make a list of everything you’ll need for your pet while on vacation, and secondly pack enough of it for the entire duration of your trip. Here’s a quick list that I came up with:

4. Make sure your microchip information is up-to-date. If your pet isn’t microchipped, make sure to get one done at your vet’s office. If they are already microchipped, update your information online to include your cell phone number in case they escape while away from home.
5. Practice makes perfect! If your dog isn’t used to car rides, take small trips in preparation for the long haul. Slowly build up the amount of time that you’re in the car until you’re confident that your pet will tolerate a long road trip.

While you’re on the road, make sure to give plenty of water and stop every few hours for a stretch and to relieve them. Take a short walk at each rest stop to reduce anxiousness. If you can, go for a run or do some exerting activity so that they’re nice and tired for the next leg of the trip!

Do you have any words of wisdom for any pet lovers getting ready to go on a road trip with their furry companions? Leave them in the comments!

Puppy Training: Housebreaking Tips for the New Member of Your Family

Hi Pet Blog Readers!  As we eagerly anticipate the weekend, we have an article from guest blogger Sam Buddy.  He has written a nice post about bringing a new dog into your home.  Housebreaking a new pup or dog can be a trying task.  Sam has a few ideas that should help you get prepared for the new addition to your home.  If you have any questions or comments, or any new puppy housebreaking ideas of your own, let us know in the comments section.  Have a great weekend!

____________________________________________

 

He’s so fluffy, you could die! The latest addition to your family, a lovely, furry little thing that can literally turn you into that overexcited little girl in the movie “Despicable Me” – he’s so great for cuddling and nuzzling. All of you are likely to be blindly in love with the puppy for, at most, a week. After that, all members of the family will be pointing fingers at who should have the turn to take the cutie out for a tinkle or a poop session. You all love the pup dearly but he will prove to be quite a handful and a big challenge for the family.

One of your responsibilities as new pet owners is to housebreak your pup. This way, before his natural temperament completely takes over and habits form, you can lead him to the right path of development that will not only benefit him but also your whole family. To housebreak the doggie and protect your home dynamics and relationship, here are tips from trusted professional breeders of purebreds and designer dogs, Chevromist Kennels.

 

    • Do your homework.  Learn more about the specific breed of your puppy because their breed will determine their characteristics and developmental needs. Knowing these things will allow you to modify your own behaviours as primary care providers, and even your home design.

 

ChoosingDog

    • Designate places for your puppy’s daily routine.  Chevromist advises pet owners to make sure the dog has a safe place to relieve himself. Over time, this specific area will tell your dog that it’s where he can do his “business” comfortably.

 

    • Install convenience and safety features for the dog.  These will allow him to create and stick to the routine easier so even if nobody’s home to take him out to urinate or defecate, or give him food, he can still smoothly go about his daily activities.

 

    • Be patient.  Habit formation takes time and patience; dogs are sensitive beings and the way you deliver instructions and your reactions to them impact their ability to learn important lessons. Screaming at your pup or rushing him while he’s trying to relieve himself will stress him out and make it harder for him to work with a routine, to trust you, and at times, it may even cause him to lose control over his bodily functions.

 

  • Reinforce good behaviour with rewards.  This is an essential part of dog training and this doesn’t need to be an edible treat all the time; extra cuddles, loving coos, affectionate pats on the head will have the pup learning necessary behaviours, like going outside to relieve himself, that would earn him such treats.

About The Author: Sam Buddy is a pet owner and a freelance writer. He feels a special connection with his pets, most especially to his dog. He treats them as part of his family. He even brings his dog with him every time he travels. He spends most his time learning and sharing informative content about pets. Sam uses this resource for helpful pet care information: http://chevromistreviews.com.au/.

Dog Facts: 7 Things You Might Not Know About Your Canine Companion

Good day, Pet Blog Readers.  Today we have an interesting article written by guest blogger Christian Wolb, from Hopi Animal Hospital in Scottsdale, Arizona.  He has compiled a list of 7 fun facts you may not know about your dog.  Some are fun behaviors, some are early indicators of potential health problems.  Take a look, and if you have any fun facts about dogs that you would like to share, let us know in the comments section.  Thanks!

_____________________________________________

 

How well do you know your dog sitting on your sofa? Why is he playing odd sometimes? Is your canine doing it on purpose or just desire to make fun of you? The days you are with your dogs do not guarantee how good you know them as well as their odd practices. Let’s try to find out some wonderful dog facts and know them more than what their wagging tail seems to tell.

 

Canine Fact Number 1:  When your dog chases his/her tail, he might need help from the vet.

A wide variety of reasons clarify why dogs chase their tail: exercise, predatory instinct, discomfort or presence of fleas. Nevertheless, to talk with your vet is the safest and surest approach to get the actual reason why your dog keeps chasing his/her tail.

 

3823200771_b745a54697_zCanine Fact Number 2:  Dogs dream while asleep.

Do not be shocked if you see your dog barking or moving his/her feet while asleep. He/she may have been chasing his/her dearest at the park in his/her dream. Humans and dogs share the same SWS (slow wave sleep) as well as REM (rapid eye movement) while asleep. So let him/her experience the moment to savor twitching while the eyes are closed.

 

Dog Fact Number 3:  They have night vision.

Do you know how dogs can freely move in the dark? How did they even get robbers trying to steal your valuables when it’s dark? Well, dogs have tapetum lucidum, which gives them the ability them to see even when it’s dark.

 

7385054252_8e8ba99e34_zCanine Fact Number 4:  If he/she is acting comical, go find your umbrella.

Although scientists have not yet found the mystery behind this, but according to some, dogs can determine the weather especially when it’s going to rain. So, the next time you discover your dog acting funny, go get the umbrella straight away. Besides, it pays to be all set at all cost.

 

 

Dog Fact Number 5:  Dogs don’t sweat like we do.

Dogs do not sweat everywhere. As a matter of fact, they only sweat on their pads. When you find that their paw pads are sweating, you get the notion that the area is a bit warm for them to reside.

 

Dog Fact Number 6: Your dog’s nose is wet because he/she is absorbing scent.

Popularly known to be the captain of scent, dogs secrete a mucous on their nose to help them recognize the scent (more accurately than we do). When their noses get wet, they would lick them to sample the scent they have gathered with their mouth.

 

Canine Fact Number 7:  They are the chief of scent.

Dogs can smell 100,000 times more accurate than their owners. No wonder why even the FBI and peace order departments of our local government search help from them in searching unwanted items in certain public places. This also explains why when you leave your cookies unattended; you would be left with nothing but the food container.

 

There are other things that you do not understand about your pet so do not easily label them by the way they act or kick after peeing in your couch. Some of the strange stuffs they do may really be funny but it is always ideal to visit your vet on a regular basis.

 

Author’s bio:

Do you want to know more about your pets? Visit http://www.hopianimalhospital.com/ and discuss your pet concerns with people dedicated to provide pet care services for the wellbeing of your pets.

Heartworm Prevention: Keeping Your Dog Heart Healthy

Hi Pet Blog Readers, Good Monday!  To start off the week, we have a post from guest blogger Karleia Steiner.  She has authored an informative article about heartworms in dogs.  Heartworms can be a serious problem for your dog, so it is a good idea to take preventative action and stop them before they affect your favorite canine.  Karleia has some great tips that should help keep your pooch happy and healthy.  If you have ideas that you would like to share, please let us know in the comments section.  Thanks!

 

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Heartworm disease is a condition where parasitic worms live inside of the pulmonary arteries. This condition may also affect the right side of the heart. It primarily affects dogs, but it can affect cats, foxes, ferrets, coyotes and sea lions. Heartworm disease can make an animal seriously ill and even cause death. There are treatments for this condition, but in many cases, the treatments result in complications. Fortunately, it can be prevented. Below are some tips that will help prevent heartworm.

Heart Health Protecting Your Pooch from HeartwormFollow A Heartworm Prevention Plan

One of the best things that you can do to prevent your dog from getting heartworm is to follow your veterinarian’s heartworm prevention plan. Your veterinarian may recommend that your dog take chewables or tablets monthly or daily. Your veterinarian may also recommend injections. Heartworm medications will not work on an animal that already have heartworms.

All heartworm prevention medications work in the same way. They work by killing larvae heartworms. Heartworm medications do not work on adult heartworms. That is why it is very important for you to make sure that your dog consistently takes the heartworm medication.

You should also have your dog tested for heartworm at least once a year. Your veterinarian may recommend more frequent testing if needed. This will ensure your dog is heartworm-free before he or she continues taking the medication. Veterinarians can perform a blood test in order to diagnose heartworm. The test checks for antigens that the adult heartworms release into the bloodstream. However, the test usually do not detect heartworm infections that are less than five months old. You can visit Brimley-Lawrence Animal Clinic if you want to know more about heartworm testing.

Reduce Your Dog’s Exposure To Mosquitos

Infected mosquitos transmit heartworm. That is why you will also need to limit your dog’s exposure to mosquitos. The mosquitos are most active after sunset, so you should keep your dog inside during this time if possible. You may also want to consider using a product that is designed to repel and kill mosquitos. This will also reduce your dog’s chances of being infected with heartworm.

 

In summary, heartworm disease can be deadly, but there are some things that can be done to prevent it. You will need to take your dog to the veterinarian in order to get a heartworm prevention plan. You will also need to get your dog tested for heartworms regularly. Additionally, you should reduce your dog’s exposure to mosquitos.

Dogs and Babies: Tips for Introducing Your Pet to Your Newborn

When my husband and I were expecting our first child, part of our preparations included getting Chester (our 6 year old hound dog) ready for the baby. We have all been told to bring something home from the hospital with the baby’s scent on it but did you know there are other ways you can help prepare your dog for their new little brother or sister?

Set Up The Stuff

Babies come with tons, and I mean TONS, of stuff. You can help your dog prepare by slowly putting the new items out. Set up your crib one day and then that fancy new swing or play mat a few days later. Take it slow and let him get used to each item before adding the next. Introducing these items gradually will give your dog a chance to smell and explore each one, and then when your baby arrives he will already be used to those things being in the house.

Bring Babies Around

Chester
Have friends with babies? Have them over. If your dog has never been around a baby you may want to see how he reacts to the crying and all the new little movements. Some people have even used those electronic babies you were forced to bring home from health class. Lucky we have lots of family and friends with kids, so Chester has had exposure to children of all ages.

Set Boundaries

Let your dog know what’s okay and what’s not. If he won’t be allowed in the nursery after the baby comes, don’t let him in now. If you let him do things now that you won’t let him do when the baby arrives it’s going to confuse him and he could end up resenting you or your little one.

Tell Him About The Baby

Everyone says that dogs can tell when you are pregnant and I really believe that Chester knew. It might sound silly to a non pet owner, but I talk to Chester like he’s my best friend so naturally I told him all about his little sister before she arrived. I like to think he understood and that helped him prepare.

Stock Up On Treats And Toys

In the weeks after you bring your little one home your front door will be like one of those revolving doors at the mall, people coming in and out all the time. Chester is extremely food motivated, so we stocked up on lots of different types of treats. We got some of his favorite training treats to reward him for good behavior or if we needed to temporarily distract him from the door or other items. We also loaded up on some long lasting treats like Greenies , filled bones, and Indigo chews. These were good to have when he would get a little too excited and we needed to divert his attention for a longer period of time. If you are worried about over treating or your dog is on a diet, toys can also be used to keep your pup occupied.

Have A Plan

This may be common sense but make sure you have a reliable pet sitter on call. Child birth is unpredictable–you can go into labor at any time and be in the hospital for an undetermined amount of time. Make sure you have one, if not two, pet sitters that will be able to get your dog within a few hours when the big day comes.

Chester2

Control The Introduction

Chances are that you haven’t seen your dog for a few days, so he is going to be really happy to see you. Give him a little time to get his excitement out and give you all the kisses he wants before bringing in the baby. What worked for us was to have my mom take Emmalynne into her nursery when my husband brought Chester home. Once he was over the excitement of seeing me he sniffed around at the diaper bag and car seat then we took him in to meet his little sister.

Keep Calm

Your dog can tell if you are nervous and that can make him uneasy, if you stay calm and don’t make a huge deal out of him meeting the little one he won’t either. Remember to take it easy on your pup; this is a huge adjustment for him too. Dog toys and baby toys are surprisingly similar so you can’t really blame him for chewing on one you leave out.

Don’t Forget Your Dog

Make sure your dog gets enough exercise and attention. Try to stick with his normally scheduled feedings and walks; you don’t want to have to deal with accidents just because you didn’t have time to let him out. We take Chester with us everywhere that we are allowed to. So even though it might be easier to leave him home sometimes, we make sure that if we would have taken him before Emmalynne was born, we take him now. I look at it more like; we now have two kids rather than one kid and a dog.

These are some of the things that helped Chester make the transition from only child to older brother. Emmalynne is now two months old and Chester has taken on the role of her protector. When someone new holds her he is watching their every move. He is more alert and curious about abnormal noises. In the mornings when she’s in our room sleeping and I’m getting ready he lays in the doorway where he can keep an eye on both of us. It makes me feel good knowing that he is looking out for her (as all big brothers should). I think he has accepted her as a member of our family and I am excited to see how their relationship grows as she gets older!

 

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